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St. Johns County Federal Criminal Defense Lawyers

Federal crimes are typically more complex and carry harsher penalties than state crimes. If you are facing federal charges, you need an experienced attorney who can help you navigate the federal court system and build a strong defense on your behalf.

If you are facing federal charges, you need an experienced attorney who can help you build a strong defense. At First Coast Criminal Defense, we have the knowledge and resources to handle even the most complex federal cases. Our St. Johns County federal criminal defense attorneys will fight to protect your rights and your future every step of the way.

Call (904) 474-3115 or contact us online to schedule a free consultation with our federal crimes lawyer in St. Johns County.

What is a Federal Crime?

A federal crime refers to a criminal offense that is prohibited by U.S. federal legislation and falls under the jurisdiction of federal law enforcement agencies and federal courts. These crimes are prosecuted at the federal level, and the penalties for convictions are determined by federal sentencing guidelines. Common types of federal crimes include:

It's important to note that federal crimes typically involve offenses that transcend state borders or have a significant impact on federal interests. Federal law enforcement agencies, such as the FBI and DEA, investigate and enforce federal laws, while federal prosecutors handle cases in federal courts.

Some of the most common types of federal crimes include:

  • Drug Trafficking: The illegal distribution, sale, or transportation of controlled substances.
  • White-Collar Crimes: Non-violent financial crimes committed by individuals or businesses, such as fraud, embezzlement, and insider trading.
  • Bank Fraud: Any fraudulent activity involving a bank, such as forging checks or using false information to obtain loans.
  • Mail Fraud: The use of the postal system to carry out fraudulent schemes.
  • Wire Fraud: Similar to mail fraud but involves the use of electronic communication, such as phone or internet, to commit fraud.
  • Identity Theft: Unauthorized use of someone else's personal information for fraudulent purposes.
  • Counterfeiting: The production or distribution of fake currency, goods, or documents.
  • Money Laundering: The process of making illegally-gained proceeds (money) appear legal.
  • Child Pornography: The production, distribution, or possession of explicit materials involving minors.
  • Internet Crimes: Various offenses committed online, including hacking, cyberstalking, and online fraud.
  • Weapons Offenses: Violations of federal laws related to firearms and other weapons.
  • Immigration Crimes: Offenses related to illegal immigration, such as smuggling or document fraud.
  • Human Trafficking: The illegal trade of humans for forced labor or commercial sexual exploitation.
  • Racketeering: Engaging in a pattern of organized criminal activity.
  • Organized Crime: Criminal activities carried out by organized groups, such as the Mafia or drug cartels.
  • Conspiracy: Planning and conspiring with others to commit a federal crime.
  • Terrorism: Acts intended to intimidate or coerce a civilian population, often for political purposes.

How Are Federal Crimes Investigated?

When a federal crime is committed, it is typically investigated by a federal agency, such as the FBI, DEA, or IRS. These agencies have extensive resources and can spend months or even years investigating a single case.

During the investigation, the agency will gather evidence to build a case against the suspect. This may include interviewing witnesses, reviewing financial records, and conducting surveillance. If the agency believes they have enough evidence to prove the suspect’s guilt, they will present their case to a federal prosecutor.

The prosecutor will then review the evidence and determine whether or not to file charges. If charges are filed, the suspect will be arrested and the case will proceed to court.

What is the Difference Between State and Federal Crimes?

There are several key differences between state and federal crimes. First, federal crimes are typically more serious than state crimes. They often involve large sums of money, multiple victims, or interstate commerce. As a result, they carry harsher penalties.

Second, federal crimes are investigated by federal agencies, such as the FBI, DEA, or IRS. These agencies have extensive resources and can spend months or even years investigating a single case. As a result, federal cases are often more complex than state cases.

Finally, federal crimes are prosecuted by federal prosecutors. These prosecutors are highly experienced and have a high conviction rate. As a result, it is important to have an experienced federal crimes attorney on your side if you are facing federal charges.

What Are the Penalties for Federal Crimes?

The penalties for federal crimes vary depending on the specific offense. However, as we mentioned earlier, they are typically more severe than the penalties for state crimes. In addition to prison time and fines, you may also be required to pay restitution to the victims of the crime.

Many federal crimes also carry mandatory minimum sentences. This means that if you are convicted, the judge must sentence you to at least the minimum sentence. For example, if you are convicted of a federal drug crime, you may be required to serve a minimum of 10 years in prison.

Some of the factors that can affect the penalties for a federal crime include:

  • The specific offense
  • The amount of money involved
  • The number of victims
  • Your criminal history
  • Whether or not a weapon was used
  • Whether or not anyone was injured

How Can a Federal Crimes Lawyer Help?

If you are facing federal charges, you need an experienced attorney who can help you build a strong defense. At First Coast Criminal Defense, we have the knowledge and resources to handle even the most complex federal cases. We will conduct a thorough investigation into the charges against you and work to uncover any evidence that can be used to challenge the prosecution’s case.

Our team will also review the evidence to determine whether or not it was obtained legally. If the evidence was obtained through an illegal search and seizure, we will file a motion to have it suppressed. If the motion is successful, the prosecution may be forced to drop the charges.

In some cases, it may be in your best interest to negotiate a plea deal with the prosecution. If this is the case, we will fight to secure the best possible deal on your behalf. If the prosecution is unwilling to offer a fair deal, we will not hesitate to take your case to trial.

Our team has extensive trial experience and will aggressively defend your rights in court. We will work to cast doubt on the prosecution’s case and fight to secure a favorable verdict on your behalf.

Contact us today at (904) 474-3115 to discuss your case with our experienced team.

"I have had the pleasure of working with First Coast Criminal Defense, and it was a wonderful experience, I would highly recommend this Firm. They are totally responsive and will walk you through each phase step by step!"
Vincent

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